bluetapes:

Iceland by olgeir on Flickr.

bluetapes:

Iceland by olgeir on Flickr.

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mountstar:

Types of matter

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wishfulthinkment:

" John Napier of Merchiston (1550 – 4 April 1617) – also signed as Neper, Nepair – named Marvellous Merchiston, was a Scottish landowner known as a mathematician, physicist, and astronomer. He was the 8th Laird of Merchistoun.

John Napier is best known as the discoverer of logarithms. He also invented the so-called “Napier’s bones” and made common the use of the decimal point in arithmetic and mathematics….” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Napier

" He was ‘the person to whom the title of great man is more justly due than to any other whom this country has produced’. In this simple pronouncement, the Scottish intellectual David Flume summed up his fellow countryman John Napier.

Yet most Scots know little or nothing about the 16th-century mathematician, philosopher and inventor who, from his secluded tower in Scotland, produced the vital tool needed by mankind to explore the globe and fathom the universe. Without Napier’s invention of logarithms and the decimal notation for complex fractions, the discoveries of others such as Galileo, Kepler and Newton would have been hindered by years of long and complex calculations.

For decades Napier wrestled with mathematics in the privacy of his home, while his superstitious neighbours grew convinced he was involved in sorcery and witchcraft. Dressing in a long, black gown to match his thick, black beard, he did nothing to dispel their illusions. He achieved one of the greatest mathematical discoveries of all time while living through one of the most violent and turbulent periods in Scotland’s history with his home town of Edinburgh embroiled in civil war and ravaged by the plague….” http://www.electricscotland.com/HISTORY/other/john_napier.htm


See also, The Works of John Napier. http://www.croninsolutions.com/writing/JohnNapier.pdf

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lightprocesses:

Walking from the side (II)

lightprocesses:

Walking from the side (II)

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idadarksky:

The Bortle Scale

The Bortle scale is a nine-level numeric scale that measures the night sky’s brightness of a particular location. It quantifies the astronomical observability of celestial objects and the interference caused by light pollution. John E. Bortle created the scale and published it in the February 2001 edition of Sky & Telescope magazine to help amateur astronomers evaluate the darkness of an observing site, and secondarily, to compare the darkness of observing sites. The scale ranges from Class 1, the darkest skies available on Earth, through Class 9, inner-city skies.

(Source: Wikipedia)

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florafaunagifs:

Leaf bug (Phyllium giganteum)
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animadetv:

The perpetual babbit machine - play the web game here

animadetv:

The perpetual babbit machine - play the web game here

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curiosamathematica:

Sperner’s lemma
Color the vertices of a triangulated triangle with three colors such that:
each vertex of the main triangle has a different color;
each vertex on an edge of the main triangle is colored with one of the two colors at the end of its edge;
then there exists a small triangle whose vertices are colored with all three different colors. More precisely, there exists an odd number of such triangles.
This result looks playful and innocent but is in fact quite powerful. It is known, for instance, to lead to an easy proof of Brouwer’s fixed point theorem. Its power mainly lies in building bridges between discrete, combinatorial mathematics and continuous mathematics.

curiosamathematica:

Sperner’s lemma

Color the vertices of a triangulated triangle with three colors such that:

  • each vertex of the main triangle has a different color;
  • each vertex on an edge of the main triangle is colored with one of the two colors at the end of its edge;

then there exists a small triangle whose vertices are colored with all three different colors. More precisely, there exists an odd number of such triangles.

This result looks playful and innocent but is in fact quite powerful. It is known, for instance, to lead to an easy proof of Brouwer’s fixed point theorem. Its power mainly lies in building bridges between discrete, combinatorial mathematics and continuous mathematics.

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thisismyplacetobe:

A ‘Ring of Fire’ solar eclipse is a rare phenomenon that occurs when the moon’s orbit is at its apogee: the part of its orbit farthest away from the Earth. Because the moon is so far away, it seems smaller than normal to the human eye. The result is that the moon doesn’t entirely block out our view of the sun, but leaves an “annulus,” or ring of sunlight glowing around it. Hence the term  “annular” eclipse rather than a “total” eclipse.

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suparlak:

"I put my heart and soul into my work, and I have lost my mind in the process." — Vincent van Gogh

suparlak:

"I put my heart and soul into my work, and I have lost my mind in the process." 
— Vincent van Gogh

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Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to a better understanding of ourselves.

Carl Gustav Jung 

(via chachannet)

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Scientists must have a vivid intuitive imagination, for new ideas are not generated by deduction but by an artistically creative imagination. Max Planck (via intj-paradigm)
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