asylum-art:

Limzy Wei: Flowergirls

artist on tumblr

Malaysian artist Lim Zhi Wei adorns her watercolors entitled “ Flowergirls” with real flowers, to a stunning effect.
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normaltd:

concertsrock:

Dean Martin - Everybody loves somebody

─═ڿڰۣڿ☻ڿڰۣڿ═─

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normaltd:

myrecordcollections:

Caught by my surprise, i didn’t realised this song is written by him as well. I love his phrasing on this performance

─═ڿڰۣڿ☻ڿڰۣڿ═─

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mashable:

This week, computer programmer Ada Lovelace’s legacy is being celebrated with events around the world designed to encourage women to pursue careers in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). 

So who was Lovelace? In 1843, at age 27, Lovelace envisioned the future of computer technology as we know it — nearly a hundred years before the first computer was even invented.

Learn more about Lovelace and her groundbreaking work here.

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mathematica:

amiagoodperson:

cantor dust - with fancy linear interpolation

[Wikipedia, MathWorld]

mathematica:

amiagoodperson:

cantor dust - with fancy linear interpolation

[Wikipedia, MathWorld]

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falcemartello:

un-gif-dans-ta-gueule: Parkour !
——-
Au revoir..

falcemartello:

un-gif-dans-ta-gueule: Parkour !

——-

Au revoir..

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fyeahastropics:

The Milky Road Credit & Copyright: Larry Landolfi
Explanation: Inspired during a visit to Fort Davis, Texas, home of McDonald Observatory and dark night skies, photographer Larry Landolfi created this tantalizing fantasy view. The composited image suggests the Milky Way is a heavenly extension of a deserted country road. Of course, the name for our galaxy, the Milky Way (in Latin, Via Lactea), does refer to its appearance as a milky band or path in the sky. In fact, the word galaxy itself derives from the Greek for milk. Visible on moonless nightsfrom dark sky areas, though not so colorful as in this image, the glowing celestial band is due to the collective light of myriad stars along the plane of our galaxy, too faint to be distinguished individually. The diffuse starlight is cut by dark swaths of obscuring galactic dust clouds. At the beginning of the 17th century, Galileo turned his telescope on the Milky Way and announced it to be composed of innumerable stars.

fyeahastropics:

The Milky Road 
Credit & CopyrightLarry Landolfi

Explanation: Inspired during a visit to Fort Davis, Texas, home of McDonald Observatory and dark night skies, photographer Larry Landolfi created this tantalizing fantasy view. The composited image suggests the Milky Way is a heavenly extension of a deserted country road. Of course, the name for our galaxy, the Milky Way (in Latin, Via Lactea), does refer to its appearance as a milky band or path in the sky. In fact, the word galaxy itself derives from the Greek for milk. Visible on moonless nightsfrom dark sky areas, though not so colorful as in this image, the glowing celestial band is due to the collective light of myriad stars along the plane of our galaxy, too faint to be distinguished individually. The diffuse starlight is cut by dark swaths of obscuring galactic dust clouds. At the beginning of the 17th century, Galileo turned his telescope on the Milky Way and announced it to be composed of innumerable stars.

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un:

2headedsnake:

Apolonis

Carousel!

un:

2headedsnake:

Apolonis

Carousel!

(Source: apolonis.deviantart.com)

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nevver:

Dark now my sky, Andy Lee

(Source: behance.net)

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antikythera-astronomy:

Be very excited. On October 19th something ridiculous is going to happen. A rare comet from the Oort Cloud at the edge of our solar system is going to fly past NASA’s MAVEN robot as it orbits around Mars.  It’ll be so close that they’re going to postpone work on Mars and study the comet for five days.
This will be the closest a comet’s ever gotten to Mars in human history and it’s coming from so far away that it’s likely going to have a lot of material we otherwise couldn’t find in the solar system very easily.
The chances of this happening are far less than one in a million.

antikythera-astronomy:

Be very excited. On October 19th something ridiculous is going to happen. A rare comet from the Oort Cloud at the edge of our solar system is going to fly past NASA’s MAVEN robot as it orbits around Mars.  It’ll be so close that they’re going to postpone work on Mars and study the comet for five days.

This will be the closest a comet’s ever gotten to Mars in human history and it’s coming from so far away that it’s likely going to have a lot of material we otherwise couldn’t find in the solar system very easily.

The chances of this happening are far less than one in a million.

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spring-of-mathematics:

Geometrical Constructions [part 1] - [part 2] - [part 3]

I think “Geometrical Constructions” is a handy reference about geometry.

In figure 25: Draw a circle that will tangent two lines and go through a given point C on the line F C, which bisects the angle of the lines.Through C draw AB at right angles to C F; bisect the angles D A B and E B A, and the crossing on C F is the center of the required circle.

Or In figure 28: To plot out a circle arc without recourse to its center, but its chord A B and height h being given.
With the chord as radius, and A and B as centers, draw the dotted circle ares A C and B D. Through the point 0 draw the lines A O o and B O o, Make the arcs C o = A o and D o = B o. Divide these arcs into any desired number of equal parts, and number them as shown on the illustration. Join A and B with the divisions, and the crossings of equal numbers are points in the circle arc.

See more at Geometrical Constructions [part 1] - [part 2] - [part 3] Source: Scientific American Reference Book on chestofbooks.com.

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