christmasgirl94:

So you can keep me inside the pocket of your ripped jeans, 

Holding me closer til our eyes meet,

You wont ever be alone… Wait for me to come home. 

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eyelovepi:

This #SpaceStation for #Geometricians Has, as Outer Hulls, Twelve #Trapezoids, and Six #Parallelograms with One Square Window / Docking Port Each.
I can’t think of any good reasons for geometricans not to have their own space station, and I know what we’d do there:  we’d work on geometry (also known informally as “playing with shapes”).

eyelovepi:

This #SpaceStation for #Geometricians Has, as Outer Hulls, Twelve #Trapezoids, and Six #Parallelograms with One Square Window / Docking Port Each.

I can’t think of any good reasons for geometricans not to have their own space station, and I know what we’d do there:  we’d work on geometry (also known informally as “playing with shapes”).

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Saturn at Equinox
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echophon:

Grid Wave

echophon:

Grid Wave

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reginasworld:

Antonio Javier Caparo

reginasworld:

Antonio Javier Caparo

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(Source: sizvideos)

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normaltd:

The Police - Every Little Thing She Does is Magic

─═ڿڰۣڿ☻ڿڰۣڿ═─

(Source: classicrockneverdies)

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sciencesourceimages:

How Mandelbrot’s Fractals Changed The World

by Jack Challoner/BBC News

During the 1980s, people became familiar with fractals through those weird, colorful patterns made by computers. But few realize how the idea of fractals has revolutionized our understanding of the world, and how many fractal-based systems we depend upon.

Unfortunately, there is no definition of fractals that is both simple and accurate. Like so many things in modern science and mathematics, discussions of “fractal geometry” can quickly go over the heads of the non-mathematically-minded. This is a real shame, because there is profound beauty and power in the idea of fractals.

The best way to get a feeling for what fractals are is to consider some examples. Clouds, mountains, coastlines, cauliflowers and ferns are all natural fractals. These shapes have something in common - something intuitive, accessible and aesthetic.

They are all complicated and irregular: the sort of shape that mathematicians used to shy away from in favor of regular ones, like spheres, which they could tame with equations.

Mandelbrot famously wrote: “Clouds are not spheres, mountains are not cones, coastlines are not circles, and bark is not smooth, nor does lightning travel in a straight line.”

The chaos and irregularity of the world - Mandelbrot referred to it as “roughness” - is something to be celebrated. It would be a shame if clouds really were spheres, and mountains cones.

Look closely at a fractal, and you will find that the complexity is still present at a smaller scale. A small cloud is strikingly similar to the whole thing. A pine tree is composed of branches that are composed of branches - which in turn are composed of branches.

Read the entire article

Fractal images © Laguna Design / Science Source

Mandelbrodt photo © Emilio Segrè / Science Source

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adamhrabovsky:

Heavens Peak Overlook II © Adam Hrabovsky

adamhrabovsky:

Heavens Peak Overlook II 
© Adam Hrabovsky
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guillaumeguerillot:

Top 5 physicists > Ludwig BoltzmannQui peux voir l’avenir ? Ayons une ouverture dans toutes les directions de la recheche, loin des dogmes, que ce soit atomiste ou non-atomiste ! Who sees the future? Let us have free scope for all directions of research; away with dogmatism, either atomistic or anti-atomistic!

guillaumeguerillot:

Top 5 physicists > Ludwig Boltzmann

Qui peux voir l’avenir ? Ayons une ouverture dans toutes les directions de la recheche, loin des dogmes, que ce soit atomiste ou non-atomiste !

Who sees the future? Let us have free scope for all directions of research; away with dogmatism, either atomistic or anti-atomistic!

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pdvmorris:

Almost Like the Blues ~ Leonard Cohen 

I was driftin’ around…not that four wheel kind but maybe in there somewhere — when I heard this one on my iPod — I began to breach a huge smile.  Feck, yes, Cousin Leo, yes!!!!  Now he speaks from the place that very few performers and certainly no “Rock” folks vantage point.  80 years on the Blue Marble and still his poetic soul shines — one of my ward mates in the medico farm said something about it not really being singing….told him to take some more Thorazine and call the doc in the morning!  Yes, please I’ll have some of what Leonard is having!  Ironically, I am closer in age to Mr. Cohen than I am to my younger sister.  Peace, love and heavy sauce, y’all! 

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spring-of-mathematics:

Envelope and String Art

In geometry, an envelope of a family of curves in the plane is a curve that is tangent to each member of the family at some point. Classically, a point on the envelope can be thought of as the intersection of two “adjacent” curves, meaning the limit of intersections of nearby curves. This idea can be generalized to an envelope of surfaces in space, and so on to higher dimensions.

Image:

Reference: Envelope (Mathematics) on Wiki - Envelope on mathworld.wolfram.com.

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distant-traveller:

Potentially habitable moons

For astrobiologists, these may be the four most tantalizing moons in our Solar System. Shown at the same scale, their exploration by interplanetary spacecraft has launched the idea that moons, not just planets, could have environments supporting life. The Galileo mission to Jupiter discovered Europa’s global subsurface ocean of liquid water and indications of Ganymede’s interior seas. At Saturn, the Cassini probe detected erupting fountains of water ice from Enceladus indicating warmer subsurface water on even that small moon, while finding surface lakes of frigid but still liquid hydrocarbons beneath the dense atmosphere of large moon Titan. Now looking beyond the Solar System, new research suggests that sizable exomoons, could actually outnumber exoplanets in stellar habitable zones. That would make moons the most common type of habitable world in the Universe.

Image Credit: Research and compilation - René Heller (McMaster Univ.) et al.  Panels - NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute - Copyright: Ted Stryk

distant-traveller:

Potentially habitable moons

For astrobiologists, these may be the four most tantalizing moons in our Solar System. Shown at the same scale, their exploration by interplanetary spacecraft has launched the idea that moons, not just planets, could have environments supporting life. The Galileo mission to Jupiter discovered Europa’s global subsurface ocean of liquid water and indications of Ganymede’s interior seas. At Saturn, the Cassini probe detected erupting fountains of water ice from Enceladus indicating warmer subsurface water on even that small moon, while finding surface lakes of frigid but still liquid hydrocarbons beneath the dense atmosphere of large moon Titan. Now looking beyond the Solar System, new research suggests that sizable exomoons, could actually outnumber exoplanets in stellar habitable zones. That would make moons the most common type of habitable world in the Universe.

Image Credit: Research and compilation - René Heller (McMaster Univ.) et al.  Panels - NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute - Copyright: Ted Stryk

(Source: apod.nasa.gov)

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mathhombre:

L Spiral.

This is a generalization of a diagram I saw from d3lt4 on Tumblr:

It is constructed by rotating and dilating the L shape to fit in with itself, rotated 90 degrees. There are some interesting properties that develop based on the height/width ratio and the thickness of the L-shape. At first I thought D3lt4’s diagram was based on an L from a square with thickness half of the width, but instead it is Golden.

The last image is close to real Golden ratio proportions.

On GeoGebraTube for play.

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lustik:

Stained Glass Driverless Sleeper Car of the Future by Dominic Wilcox.

Photos: Sylvain Deleu

It’s on exhibition now at:
Design Junction, London
18-21 September 2014
The Sorting Office
21-31 New Oxford Street
London WC1A 1BA

Lustiktwitter | pinterest | etsy

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